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Illinois. University 



The Mini Union 



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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THE ILLINI UNION 



AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



OCTOBER 
1941 



THE LIBKAKY Of 1HE 

JUN I 71943 
UNIVERSE Of iLUW** 



URBANA- CHAMPAIGN 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/illiniunionatuniOOuniv 







"The aim was to erect a building which would be not only 
a distinguished social center, open to all students, faculty, 
and alumni, but also to inspire those who use it with 
the best traditions of our early American way of life." 

— Arthur Cutts Willard, 

President, University of Illinois 



[HE LIBKAKY OF IHt 

JUN IV 1343 
UNIVERSITY Of HUM* 4 * 




At the beginning of his administration, President Arthur Cutts Willard gave 
his attention to the movement for an Illini Union building, mindful of its poten' 
tial value m the personal education of the student. 

He knew that the Union would help cement great friendships — between 
men and women, students and faculty, people of various ages, races, and creeds. 
Friendship assumes nobility when it is built on something vital — mutual in' 
terests in intellectual ideals, common pursuits, the stimulus of vivid personalities 
upon one another. 

Already we know that, m the associations formed in this building, stu' 
dents are hammering out their political, social and religious faiths, their 
personal and moral convictions. Of such contacts is real leadership born. 




LOBBY ENTRANCE 



Come in the evening, or come in the morning; 

Come when you re \oo\ed for, or come without warning. 

— Thomas Osborne Davis 



For the first time in its history, the University of Illinois has a "front door," 
a place to greet visitors, a real social center helping to bring together students, 
faculty, and visiting alumni. It is a meeting place for many statewide organi- 
sations, for national, social, and scientific groups. As might be expected, the 
greater part of its use is by those on the campus daily. But thousands of 
alumni spend time in its lounges or dining rooms. On the second floor 
are the Faculty -Alumni Lounge as well as the offices of the Alumni 
Association, the Alumni Records, and the University of Illinois Foundation. 




MAIN LOUNGE — FIRST FLOOR 



Welcome ever smiles 

And farewell goes out sighing. 

■ — Shakespeare 



The spacious, home-like Main Lounge greets the visitor entering the building 
from historic Green Street. The Main Lounge opens to the south on a stone 
terrace facing the original quadrangle, and is, indeed, the campus center. 

Illinois, one of the last great universities to erect a Union, had the ad' 
vantage of studying many other buildings of this kind. The result is that 
space is put to the most practical use principally by students. The social 
director helps plan a broad program of student and faculty events. Con' 




GENERAL LOUNGE —SECOND FLOOR 



Loveliness 
Needs not the foreign aid of ornament, 
But is when unadorn d, adorn d the most. 

— James Thomson 



ference rooms on the second floor are busy most of the time. Musical pro- 
grams, provided by a deep-toned phonograph and a large record library, the 
gift of the Carnegie Corporation, are given three times daily in the second 
floor General Lounge, which was furnished by recent classes. The Game 
Room and Bowling Alleys are in constant use. The Illini Union Bookstore 
was intended for the new building but later it was thought more conven- 
ient to have it in another location nearby. Students share in its earnings. 




PINE LOU NICE 



Is not true leisure 

One with true toil 7 

— John Wright 



The sturdy, masculine Pine Lounge is utterly home'like, from its wide fire' 
place with a U. of I. emblem carved over it, to the window seats which look 
out over the terrace, the broad front campus near the Law Building, or down 
the elm-arched Broad Walk. 

Almost all the rooms in the Union Building have massive fireplaces — with 
closets for wood close at hand. Student'faculty coffee hours are held each week. 
The Pine Lounge and others are used by thousands of guests every month. 




WEDGWOOD LOUNGE 



Hospitality sitting with Gladness. 

— Longfellow 



The Wedgwood Lounge, in the same wing, with its delicate white carvings 
and blue walls, appeals particularly to feminine taste. It was patterned after 
the Supper Room in the Governor's Palace, at Williamsburg, Virginia. 

There are many union buildings, but there is only one which has the warm, 
cordial atmosphere of the Illini Union. In developing this residential 
character on a scale large enough for a building to be used by more than 
12,500 students, the architects accomplished something entirely unique. 




THE COMMONS 








THE TAVERN 




THIRD FLOOR DINING ROOM 



Stride mightily, hut eat and drin\ as friends. 

— Shakespeare 



Whether one goes to the bright, modern 'as -the -future Commons, the early 
Ameriean Tavern with its stone walls and heavybeamed ceiling, or to the 
richly 'decorated Colonial Room, he finds the Illini Union keeping its promise 
of serving students and others wholesome, well 'prepared food at low prices. 
From the cafeteria lines, on the lower level, one goes either to the Com' 
mons or to the Tavern. The cafeteria serves three meals daily, including 
Sunday. The Tavern is open all day and until 11 p.m. It serves fountain 
drinks, sandwiches, and other light foods. Designed to resemble an old 




COLONIAL ROOM 



To sweet repast and calm repose. 

— Gray 



New England public eating room, it has several alcoves each of which suggests 
a different period in early American life. 

On the third floor are private dining rooms which, by means of folding doors 
and sliding panels, can be used as one room accommodating approximately 300 
or can be made into a series of smaller ones. 

The Colonial Room, on the first floor, has table d'hote service for lunch and 
dinner. It is bright with Chippendale furniture and green, Chinese wallpaper 
suggesting the fashions brought back to America by the seafaring colonials. 




BROWSING ROOM 



To unpathed waters, undreamed shores. 

— Shakespeare 



The Browsing Room has proved to be one of the most popular in the Union 
Building. It offers students and others a place to wander undisturbed among 
1500 bright, colorful books. The collection contains new books, illustrated edi- 
tions of old favorites, short stories, plays and poetry, personal histories, tall tales 
and mystery stories, sketches and essays, and humor; books of adventure, of 
romance, of college life; books about art and music, exploring and travel, science, 
and man the builder. About the walls are niches for busts of great authors. 




ONE OF THE STAIRCASES 



Architecture is frozen music. 

— John Sullivan Dwight 



Fundamentally, the Illini Union is in every way a part of Illinois. Its kiln'run, 
pleasant, red brick were made within the borders of the state. Its design is 
American Georgian, particularly effective on a broad, flat countryside. It even 
has two things of cherished memory from old University Hall in its cupola— 
the Class of 78 clock and the old chapel bell. 

Although in these respects it is native, much of its design is patterned after 
the historic buildings at Williamsburg, Virginia, which have been restored to 




LOOKING TOWARD THE PINE LOUNGE 



Portals that lead to an enchanted land .... 

—Thomas Bailey Aldrich 



their original magnificence. Thus the most dignified and yet informal atmos' 
phere of the best early 'American homes lives again here in east 'central Illinois. 
Dean Rexford Newcomb, of the College of Fine and Applied Arts in the 
University, says, "When the excellence of the Illini Union's interior and ex' 
terior is considered, the building appears to be quite the finest structure upon the 
Illinois campus. As the years go by, it is bound to have a marked influence 
upon the taste of the thousands of students who will come in contact with it." 




GRAND BALLROOM 



And the best of all ways 
To lengthen our days 
Is to steal a few hours from the flight, my dear. 

— Thomas Moorp 



Even as they pass the entrance, guests usually ask, "May we see the ballroom?" 
With its tall, colonial windows softened by heavy, crimson draperies, its 
colorful chandeliers, and dark, highly- polished Fontainebleau floors, it is one of 
the most magnificent parts of the building. 

Used for supervised dances, it is also an ideal place for banquets and for 
large meetings of every kind. If they do not interfere with student use of the 
building, statewide organizations may use the room. This and most of the other 
rooms are air-conditioned. All food-service areas are treated acoustically. 




THE TERRACE 



For more than thirty years, University of Illinois students, faculty, and alumni 
have talked of a union building. In 1909, members of the Class of '09 started 
raising funds for that purpose. When the University of Illinois Foundation 
was organised, in 1935, one of its purposes was to arrange for such a building. 
The University obtained a grant of $524,820 from the Public Works Adminis- 
tration and a loan of $656,000 from the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Company for the building itself. The loan is being paid through an addition to 
student fees. Alumni contributed for equipment and furnishings. 

Thousands of Illini who gave their thought, effort, and money to make pos- 
sible the completion of this project, have the gratitude of those who enlisted their 
aid, and the thanks of all those who use the Union in this and future years. 



PLANNERS OF THE BUILDING 



Arthur Cutts Willard, President 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1 

Oscar G. Mayer, President Harold Pogue Homer Mat Adams 

Gov. Henry Horner James M. Cleary Louis C. Moschel 

Orville M. Karraker Mrs. Glenn E. Plumb John A. Wieland 

Frank A. Jensen Dr. Karl A. Meyer Supt. of Public Instruction 

H. E. Cunningham Sveinbjorn Johnson Lloyd Morey 

Secretary University Counsel University Comptroller 

DIRECTORS, U. OF I. FOUNDATION 1 

Ralph Chapman, President William E. Levis C. M. Thompson 

Robert F. Carr Albert Penn A. C. Willard 

James M. Cleary Dr. Karl A. Meyer Charles Wham 

K. J. T. Ekblaw Francis J. Plym William J. Wardall 

Fred A. Healy Charles S. Pillsbury Harold Pogue 

Oscar G. Mayer Dr. P. L. Schroeder John N. Chester 
■When plans for the building were completed. 

Charles S. Havens, Director of the Physical Plant Ernst C. Von Ammon, Interior Decorator 

Ernest L. Stouffer, University Architect AMBROSE CRAMER, Interior Decorator 

Howard L. Cheney, Consulting Architect Samuel L. Lewis, Designer of Mechanical Services 

John C. Leavell, Associate Architect Robert C. Maxwell, Structural Engineer 

English Brothers, General Contractors 



Vernon L. Kretschmer, Manager of the Building 

Irene D. Pierson, Social Director 

KATHARINE M. Ansley, Manager of Food Services 

Erwin J. ScHREIBER, Manager, Illini Union Book Store 

John T. Harman, Bowling Alley Manager 



Built with the Assistance of Federal Works Agency of the Public Works Administration 

John M. Carmody, Administrator David R. Kennicott, Regional Director 

And with a loan from the Connecticut Mutual Liee Insurance Company 

Hartford, Connecticut 



THE LIBRARY OF 1HE 

JUN 171943 
UNIVERSITY Qf 1UUW* 












UN(VlR»rTY OF ILLINOH-UHBAN* 



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